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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be that nice to anybody in politics, but i'll say this. i never heard a word spoken against his religion. and i would have been offended by that. it never came up as a negative. i never saw it anywhere. >> i agree with that. you give credit to where credit's due. they didn't take a shot on him in religion. that wouldn't have worked in this country anyway. and this is better than an inside baseball story. this is inside the dugout story. i'm not getting paid and i love talking about it. >> me too. what did you find as a journalist, what did you find? because you've been watching romney since he was a moderate republican not that long ago. >> 2002. of course he called himself moderate and progressive and so forth. the romney in 2012, he was talked into it by his son tagg and wife ann. once he decided to run, he was all in. but there was this question how do you run? the signal was let's focus on president obama's handling of the economy and lesser emphasis on biography. >> that worked well in that first debate. i was dying in that first debate he was so good. it was arrogant but it worked. why di
calendar. new report reveals the third largest religious group in the world one which there is no religion at all. stay with us. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur gregg: came face-to-face with a killer. now the sole survivor of the oregon mall shooting is out of the hospital, back with her family and telling a powerful story about what happened on the day the shots rang out at the clack mass town center. our portland affiliate kttv has the story. >> being home with family. >> reporter: surrounded by the arms of her family and on the mend from surviving the unthinkable, christina relives the moment she came face-to-face wi
a presidential presence in multi religion prayer vigil in chicago perhaps as well a speech by the present to the nation. and please don't misunderstand me. i applaud the president's sense of words and the time he shared with the families of the citizens of the town yesterday to my but he would also urge reflexion and consideration of the facts when we now them and take into account the fact that we do know. chicago right now is the murder capital of this country. those killings in chicago have risen to 20 percent of the past year. up 20%. despite the lmost always on mentioned fact that chicago has one of the toughest gun-control laws of almost any city in this country. the president called for change and change is underway. a federal appellate court tossed out the state of illinois ban of concealed weapons. the last state to deny that right to its citizens. compared illinois to states that permit concealed carry like virginia and in the five-year time guarantee does is extends to those mullen, two dozen sex- 2011, a lot of facts in this, but there are facts that we need to assemble and ex
made sense is regardless of culture and race and religion, there is some commonality. the essential human truths and passions and hopes and moral precepts that are universal. >> guest: that is part of the speech that made him famous. the united states, not just red states and blue states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. the presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he could deal with the promise and frustrations of that idea ever since. as i'm sure we would both be experiencing in the telephone calls. >> host: so your book ends in 1989. he said there is another common? >> guest: i didn't want to get too ahead of myself, but i have every intention. i've done a lot of reporting through the years. i don't want to do a quickie. i don't write my books for the politics of the moment. >> host: the book ends in 1989. but at this point, barack obama, so far lived in seattle and 1962 until 1967, back to honolulu and then back to indonesia. 1967 to 1971, back to honolulu, 79 to 1981, los angeles and then he moved to new york for
some of the core conservative groups. one question and the together was whether his religion might be an issue for evangelical voters. we know even jokers -- evangelicals have a little bit of discomfort in the faith and what it is. we did some polling last november that suggested that while they may have some misgivings about the mormon faith, it was not going to be enough to sway them from voting for obama. and the level of enthusiasm was relatively strong, even all the way into the final weeks of the campaign. it was not a lot of evidence that was a problem for them. i think the broader concern at related to the primaries and it from these past experience was that he had a favorability problem. he just was not an appealing candidates. not in terms of firing up the ideological base but appealing to the average american. by august his favorability ratings were still deeply negative territory. he had 37 percent of voters viewing him favorably. that is a -15 margin. we have never seen a presidential candidates be that- that late in an election cycle. you could go through the previous
michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations, then george will talks about religion and politics. later, james taylor from a recent appearance at the national press club. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i'm a big decision and broke with the democratic party, and went to work for john lindsay. i went
and whatever. i thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, she went into the new hampshire legislative when i was 12. she would pile everybody in the station wagon and take us to a neighborhood and drop the kids off. we would run down going door- to-door with the leaflets. then she would pick us up at the other end and take us to the next three. but at the end of the day we got an ice-cream cone, so it was all worth it. [laughter] >> all of us had strong mothers. that is what we are hearing here. my mother was my hero come too. i think that is really important for us to u
and discuss the role of religion in president everzone's life and death. but first president obama's legacy. >> i think as long as the language is spoke en in the corner of the globe, as churchill said, people will be writing about barack obama because of the historic achievement in a country as we've been talking about built on slavery, drif within racism. for a man named barack hussein obama to become president at, what was he 46 at the time, a remarkable achievement. and so that part of the story is done in a way. and the question for him now, which is totally fascinating, of course, is, okay, you're part of history. but what's the second paragraph? and right now the second paragraph is preventing great depression after financial crisis. that's not the kind of second paragraph presidents who live in history have. it's got to be more positive than that. it's got to be more active. >> health care? >> it depends. you know, i mean, if -- it's usually important, obviously, if it ultimately leads to a sustainable system where everyone has access to health care and it's seen as moral right, the
. we studied the great religions of the world. we studied for.her martin luther king junior was all about and we were ready and we would be sitting in her standing in at a theater or going on a freedom ride and we would be beaten, we would be jailed. but we didn't strike back. we had it as a way of living, in way of life, that it's better to love into hate. we wanted to build a community. we wanted to be reconciled. so this book is also about reconciliation. to give you one example, i first came to washington d.c. they first come in 1861 to go on something called a freedom ride. 18 of us, seven right and six african-americans came here may 1st. we participated in nonviolent workshops and i will never forget him the night of may 3rd, someplace in downtown washington, we went to a chinese restaurant. growing up in rural alabama, going to school in nashville i'd never been to a chinese restaurant before. never had a meal at a chinese restaurant. but at night we had a wonderful meal. food was good and someone said, you should eat while because this may be like the last supper. the next
. 6:30 p.m. we stayed up. what he accomplished in india. civil disobedience. the great religions of the world . dr. martin luther king jr. we were ready. we would be sitting in, standing at theater are going out freedom ride. we would be beaten. we would be jailed. but we didn't strike back. non-violence as a way of living, as a way of life. better to love them to hate. reconciliation. one example. i first came to washington d.c. may 1st 1961. .. food was good. and someone said, should be above because this may be like the last supper. the next day, may 4, 1961, we left washing 10, traveling from here on our way to new orleans. the first incident occurred in charlotte, north carolina. back in 1961, black people in way people could be seated together on a greyhound bus. couldn't share the same waiting room, the same restroom facilities. segregation was the order of the day. in charlotte, north carolina in may 1961, young african-american man entered a so-called weight waiting room. he went into the waiting room and later into the barbershop and tried to get shoe shine. he was arre
carried the signs and whatever. i thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. i think all the people at this table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, she went into the new hampshire legislative when i was 12. she would pile everybody in the station wagon and take us to a neighborhood and drop the kids off. we would run down going door-to- door with the leaflets. then she would pick us up at the other end and take us to the next three. but at the end of the day we got an ice-cream cone, so it was all worth it. [laughter] >> all of us had strong mothers. that is what we are hearing here. my mother was my hero come t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)